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Daily Archives: April 2, 2018

Susan B. Anthony Papers now online at Library of Congress

“The papers of reformer and suffragist Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906) span the period 1846-1934 with the bulk of the material dating from 1846 to 1906. The collection, consisting of approximately 500 items (6,265 images) on seven recently digitized microfilm reels, includes correspondence, diaries, a daybook, scrapbooks, speeches, and miscellaneous items. Donated by her niece, Lucy E. Anthony, the papers relate to Susan B. Anthony’s interests in abolition and women’s education, her campaign for women’s property rights and suffrage in New York, and her work with the National Woman Suffrage Association, the organization she and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded in 1869 when the suffrage movement split into two rival camps at odds about whether to press for a federal women’s suffrage amendment or to seek state-by-state enfranchisement. With the possible exception of her close collaborator Stanton, no woman is more associated with the campaign for women’s voting rights than Anthony, whose name became so synonymous with suffrage that the federal amendment, which formally became the Nineteenth Amendment, was called for many years by its supporters as simply the Anthony Amendment. A volume of correspondence, 1846-1905, consists primarily of Anthony’s letters to Rachel Foster Avery concerning the details of Anthony’s extensive lecture circuit, her finances, the activities of the National Woman Suffrage Association, and her work on the multivolume History of Woman Suffrage which she coedited with Stanton and others. The file also includes several letters from Anthony to the Reverend Anna Howard Shaw and letters from Wendell Phillips. Although most letters concern suffrage, a few deal with personal and family matters…”

Why So Many Public Libraries Are Now Giving Out Seeds

Atlas Obscura: “On a shelf just behind the reference desk at the Harmon branch of the Phoenix Public Library, are small pouches of seeds. Like the books and DVDs, they’re available to check out. The library allows visitors to take a few packets of the vegetable and flower seeds home for free just by showing… Continue Reading

Anticipated Park Service Report on risks from sea level rise delayed after extensive data censorship

Reveal – Center for Investigative Reporting: “National Park Service officials have deleted every mention of humans’ role in causing climate change in drafts of a long-awaited report on sea level rise and storm surge, contradicting Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s vow to Congress that his department is not censoring science. The research for the first time… Continue Reading

ABA Section of Legal Education releases comprehensive report on bar passage data

ABA news release: “The Managing Director’s Office of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar released today a comprehensive set of data on bar passage outcomes for ABA-approved law schools, showing that in the aggregate nearly 9 of 10 law graduates in 2015 who took the bar exam passed it within… Continue Reading

Vermont Legislature Passes Gun-Control Bill

WSJ: “The Vermont Senate passed a bill Friday that will heighten restrictions on firearms, including raising the purchasing age to 21 for many people and banning high-capacity magazines. The bill, sent to Republican Gov. Phil Scott’s desk, marks the latest move to tighten regulations after a gunman killed 17 people at a high school in… Continue Reading

DOJ IG special report sheds light on FBI seeking backdoor access to shooter’s iPhone

EFF: “The Department of Justice’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) last week released a new report that supports what EFF has long suspected: that the FBI’s legal fight with Apple in 2016 to create backdoor access to a San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone was more focused on creating legal precedent than it was on accessing… Continue Reading

Study: wind and solar can power most of the United States

The Guardian – John Abraham: “In order to combat climate change, we need to rapidly move from fossil fuel energy to clean, renewable energy. The two energy sources I am most interested in are wind and solar power; however, there are other sources that have great potential. Some people doubt how much wind and solar… Continue Reading

New OPM federal diversity report shows little improvement

Washington Post: “If Uncle Sam is committed to increasing the level of racial, ethnic and gender diversity in his government, particularly at the highest levels of the civil service, you sure can’t tell it from the latest statistics. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) figures show diversity levels have improved little, stayed flat or, in some… Continue Reading

Mapping the Modern Death Sentence

“Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Law have collaborated on a new website that uses a data-driven, interactive map to illustrate the rapid decline of the issuance of the death sentence in the United States since 1991. The website is a supplement to law professor Brandon Garrett’s 2017 book, “End of Its Rope: How Killing the Death… Continue Reading

Google providing WiFi and Chromebooks to school buses in rural areas

The Verge: “Google today announced an expansion of its Rolling Study Halls initiative to over 16 additional school districts, giving “thousands” of students access to Wi-Fi and Chromebooks on their buses. Google has piloted the program in North Carolina and South Carolina over the last couple years, focusing its efforts on rural communities where some… Continue Reading

Chrome Cleanup Tool on Windows PCs is scanning for malware

Motherboard: “As the head of Google Chrome security Justin Schuh explained on Twitter, the [Chrome Cleanup Tool’s] “sole purpose is to detect and remove unwanted software manipulating Chrome.” Moreover, he added, the tool only runs weekly, it only has normal user privileges (meaning it can’t go too deep into the system), is “sandboxed” (meaning its… Continue Reading

District Court Judge rules Pacer fees misused by judiciary

Law.com: “The federal judiciary misused millions of dollars in fees derived from an electronic public web portal for court documents to fund certain programs that federal law did not allow, a Washington judge ruled on Saturday. U.S. District Judge Ellen Segal Huvelle said the United States is liable for certain improper expenses that violated the… Continue Reading