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Author Archives: Sabrina I. Pacifici

FedBizOpps migrated to SAM.gov Contract Opportunities

NextGov – ..but a slow site and data migration issues made for some disgruntled users. “The new website for posting federal market research and solicitation opportunities is now live on beta.SAM.gov … if you can get the page to load. The government’s longtime go-to website for contracting opportunities, Federal Business Opportunities, also known as FedBizOpps or FBO, was shuttered over the holiday weekend as the General Services Administration shifted to the new Contract Opportunities page on SAM. However, users attempting to pull up the new page Tuesday morning were met with long load times, often resulting in the page timing out before loading. GSA officials declined to comment Tuesday on the rollout and slow load times. While patience was required Tuesday, users were able to sign in to the site using Login.gov and begin perusing. Once signed in—a process that was also made difficult by slow load times Tuesday—users can search using keywords, solicitation numbers and agencies and program offices, as in the past on FBO. The site offers additional filters, such as narrowing the search within ranges for inactive status, published date, latest updates and response due dates. Users can also search by NAICS code, place of performance and DUNS number, as well as Unique ID, the DUNS replacement to be phased in by the end of fiscal 2020…”

Federal Court Rules Suspicionless Searches of Travelers’ Phones and Laptops Unconstitutional

EFF – Government Must Have Reasonable Suspicion of Digital Contraband Before Searching People’s Electronic Devices at the U.S. Border – “In a major victory for privacy rights at the border, a federal court in Boston ruled today that suspicionless searches of travelers’ electronic devices by federal agents at airports and other U.S. ports of entry… Continue Reading

76 things you can do to boost civic engagement

Brookings: “The year 1776 was an auspicious year for democracy. The idea that a people could govern themselves was radical at the time. The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution that followed are for most Americans revered documents and a cornerstone of our democracy. Over the years, this idea of democratic republicanism has become central… Continue Reading

Chicago book returns surge 240% after city eliminates fines

AP: “Chicago public libraries have seen a 240% increase in the number of books returned since the city’s mayor eliminated overdue fines, according to a library official. Library Commissioner Andrea Telli testified at a budget hearing Wednesday, telling City Council members that abandoning the library fines policy has been instrumental in luring in both patrons… Continue Reading

Local journalism in crisis: Why America must revive its local newsroom

Brookings: “Thousands of local newspapers have closed in recent years. Their disappearance has left millions of Americans without a vital source of local news and deprived communities of an institution essential for exposing wrongdoing and encouraging civic engagement. Of those still surviving, many have laid off reporters, reduced coverage, and pulled back circulation. Over 65… Continue Reading

National Library of Israel uploads 120,000 historic books online

The Jerusalem Post: “The National Library of Israel (NLI) and Google have announced that 120,000 books from the library’s collection will be uploaded to Google Books for the first time as part of their collaboration. The books that are expected to be uploaded will, according to NLI, include all of the library’s out-of-copyright, royalty-free books… Continue Reading

Business Roundtable Ranked How Well Apple, IBM, and Amazon Actually Serve Stakeholders

Fortune: “In August, almost 200 leading business executives—including Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Apple CEO Tim Cook, JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty—made news headlines by offering a new definition for the purpose of a corporation that challenged long-held corporate orthodoxy. These chief executives, collectively known as the Business Roundtable, argued that… Continue Reading

E.P.A. to Limit Science Used to Write Public Health Rules

The New York Times: “The Trump administration is preparing to significantly limit the scientific and medical research that the government can use to determine public health regulations, overriding protests from scientists and physicians who say the new rule would undermine the scientific underpinnings of government policymaking. A new draft of the Environmental Protection Agency proposal,… Continue Reading

Six Ways for Election Officials to Prepare for High Voter Turnout in 2020

The Brennan Center for Justice – From early voting to streamlined registration, there are clear steps that will help shorten lines on Election Day. “We are now less than one year away from Election Day 2020, and Americans are projected to turn out at levels not reached since the early 20th century. Voter turnout has been steadily on… Continue Reading

LLRX October 2019 New articles and columns

Articles and Columns for October 2019 Blockchain: What Information Professionals Need to Know – Anna Irvin, Ph.D. and Janice E. Henderson, Esq. presented this comprehensive 64 page guide at the LLAGNY Education Committee Program on October 15, 2019. The guide is an multidisciplinary resource that includes: articles from law, business and finance journals, CLE programs/materials,… Continue Reading

Google’s ‘Project Nightingale’ Gathers Personal Health Data on Millions of Americans

WSJ.com [paywall]: “Google is engaged with one of the country’s largest health-care systems to collect and crunch the detailed personal health information of millions of Americans across 21 states. The initiative, code-named “Project Nightingale,” appears to be the biggest in a series of efforts by Silicon Valley giants to gain access to personal health data… Continue Reading

How Much Would You Pay for a Houseplant?

The New York Times:  Four-figure price tags. Destination auctions. Yearslong wait-lists. Rare plant collectors aren’t messing around. “…Countless articles have attempted to unspool millennial motivations for loving plants: They’re a replacement for kids, a respite from urban cityscapes, a totem of climate anxiety, a life preserver to which one can cling in uncertain times, a… Continue Reading