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Category Archives: Recommended Books

3 surprising ways to cope with climate change

Mashable: “…In the U.S., one survey conducted by the American Psychiatric Association found that more than two-thirds of Americans are somewhat or extremely anxious about climate change. Last year, the Lancet polled 10,000 youth between the ages of 16 and 25 from around the world and found that more than half reported feeling sad, anxious, angry, powerless, helpless, and guilty. The trouble with eco-anxiety, a blanket term typically used to describe distress associated with climate change, is that there’s no easy fix. As Wray points out, anguish is a normal responses to the circumstances, and yet that despair can be so debilitating that someone experiencing it might need professional mental health help. If high-quality treatment is even available, it still doesn’t change the reality that the planet continues to tilt toward ecological chaos as politicians and corporations fail to meaningfully act. In her new book, Generation Dread: Finding Purpose in an Age of Climate Crisis, Britt Wray attempts to chart a path forward for those who feel uneasy or even stuck when it comes to eco-anxiety. Wray’s approach is holistic, weaving together various strands of thought from psychology and public health to help readers cultivate the resilience and emotional intelligence they’ll need to fight for the planet — and to survive the calamities that might come…”

Legal Research Demystified, Second Edition

Voigt, Eric, Legal Research Demystified, Second Edition (Table of Contents of Book and Excerpt from Chapter 6 on Secondary Sources) (April 14, 2022). Legal Research Demystified: A Step-by-Step Approach, Second Edition (Carolina Academic Press, 2022), ISBN 978-1-5310-2130-6, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4083845 “Since 2019, Legal Research Demystified has quickly gained adoptions at over thirty law schools.… Continue Reading

The Atlantic Introducing an Expanded Books Section

The Atlantic: “…That quality of literature—and the criticism that helps make sense of it—is a large part of why we’re excited to be expanding books coverage at The Atlantic. Since its founding in 1857, this magazine “of Literature, Art, and Politics” has been home to great writing about the momentous books and literary debates of… Continue Reading

Confronting Misinformation in the Age of Cheap Speech

LawFare: “In 1995, Eugene Volokh published a law review article in which he predicted that the rapidly growing internet would “dramatically reduce the costs of distributing speech” and that “the new media order that these technologies will bring will be much more democratic and diverse than the environment we see now.” The concept, which Volokh… Continue Reading

The Internet Is Not What You Think It Is: A History, A Philosophy, A Warning

Los Angeles Review of Books: “The Internet has lost its way and taken society with it. Since the mid-2010s, we hear warnings of “dis/misinformation.” We hear about the loss of trust in our institutions and the need to reinvent them for the internet age. In short, we are living in a “crisis moment” — one… Continue Reading

How American Culture Ate the World

The New Republic: “A new book explains why Americans know so little about other countries…How did cultural globalization in the twentieth century travel along such a one-way path? And why is the U.S.—that globe-bestriding colossus with more than 700 overseas bases—so strangely isolated? The answer, Sam Lebovic’s new book, A Righteous Smokescreen: Postwar America and the… Continue Reading

Review: Public Legal Education – The Role of Law Schools In Building a More Legally Literate Society

Wallace, Amy, Review: Public Legal Education – The Role of Law Schools In Building a More Legally Literate Society (Routledge 2021) (October 8, 2021). International Journal of Public Legal Education, Forthcoming, NYLS Legal Studies Research Paper No. 3943343, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3943343 “Much has been written about public legal education (“PLE”) since the emergence of… Continue Reading

How Technology Is Changing Intelligence

Webinar now available:  “The Hoover Institution hosted How Technology Is Changing Intelligence on Friday, February 4, 2022 at 1:00 p.m. PST. Emerging technologies are changing who can collect, analyze, and act on information on a global scale. Commercial satellite imagery enabled private citizens to observe the buildup of Russian troops near the Ukraine border and social media platforms provide… Continue Reading

This book has an awful title, but says a lot of great things

FCW: “I recently finished a new book called The Power of Flexing by University of Michigan Business School professor Susan Ashford. (For the record, this is my favorite business school in the country, filled with great professors dedicated to a humane view of organizations.)  I will confess I was turned off by the “flexing” title of the… Continue Reading

What Lois Lowry Remembers

The New Yorker: “Lowry, who has lost a sister and a son, has spent decades writing about the pains of memory. Literature, she says, is “a way that we rehearse life…The title character of Lois Lowry’s most famous novel, “The Giver,” is an old man who guards all of human history and memory. The book’s… Continue Reading