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Category Archives: Knowledge Management

Twitter will label tweets with misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines

Engadget – “Twitter has introduced new rules to prevent the spread of misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccines. Under the new policy, the company will label tweets with “misleading” information and ban accounts that repeatedly break the rules. Twitter had previously banned “harmful” misinformation about the vaccines, such as claims that the vaccines are harmful or… Continue Reading

Search for copies of your page on the web

Copyscape – “Is your content original? Articles that you purchase may have been copied or stolen from other sites. Publishing them on your site can damage your reputation and ruin your search engine rankings. Protect yourself by verifying all new content with Copyscape Premium, the web’s leading solution for originality checking. Who’s stealing your content?… Continue Reading

How to make signing up for a COVID-19 vaccine less of a headache

Tech Republic – “Confusing websites and wait times of up to 60,000 minutes sabotage user confidence and slow down progress toward herd immunity.  The COVID-19 vaccine process is literally all over the map. New York State has an “Am I eligible?” app. California has a “My Turn” website. Texas has a collection of 79 vaccine… Continue Reading

Men in the Mix How to Engage Men on Issues Related to Gender in the Legal Profession

“A new report from the ABA Commission on Women in the Profession called “Men in the Mix: How to Engage Men on Issues Related to Gender in the Legal Profession,” looks at how male colleagues can become allies in the ongoing journey to reach gender equity. The report is based on research gathered from focus… Continue Reading

Data Dashboard Informs Disabled Populations About Vaccine Rollout

Health Analytics – “A team from Johns Hopkins has created a data dashboard that shows how states are prioritizing people with disabilities in the COVID-19 vaccine rollout. The tool can also help people with disabilities determine when they’re eligible for shots, and provide policymakers with data to improve the system. Created by researchers, students, and… Continue Reading

Why Opening Windows Is a Key to Reopening Schools

The New York Times -“The C.D.C. is urging communities to reopen schools as quickly as possible, but parents and teachers have raised questions about the quality of ventilation available in public school classrooms to protect against the coronavirus.We worked with a leading engineering firm and experts specializing in buildings systems to better understand the simple… Continue Reading

What is an “algorithm”? It depends whom you ask

MIT Technology Review – “…In statistics and machine learning, we usually think of the algorithm as the set of instructions a computer executes to learn from data. In these fields, the resulting structured information is typically called a model. The information the computer learns from the data via the algorithm may look like “weights” by… Continue Reading

Lizard People in the Library

Project Information Literacy Provocation Series – By Barbara Fister February 3, 2021: “As “research it yourself” becomes a rallying cry for promoters of outlandish conspiracy theories with real-world consequences, educators need to think hard about what’s missing from their information literacy efforts. Information systems that we use in our daily lives map the divisions that have… Continue Reading

The first 100 days of U.S. news coverage: Lessons about the media ecosystem for librarians, educators, students, and journalists

Alison J. Head, Steven Braun, Margy MacMillan, Jessica Yurkofsky, and Alaina C. Bull, September 15, 2020, Covid-19: The first 100 days of U.S. news coverage: Lessons about the media ecosystem for librarians, educators, students, and journalists, Project Information Literacy Research Institute, https://projectinfolit.org/publications/covid-19-the-first-100-days/ “This two-part series is about the shape and flow of U.S. media coverage… Continue Reading

Nonverbal Overload: A Theoretical Argument for the Causes of Zoom Fatigue

Bailenson, J. N. (2021). Nonverbal Overload: A Theoretical Argument for the Causes of Zoom Fatigue. Technology, Mind, and Behavior, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.1037/tmb0000030 “For decades, scholars have predicted that videoconference technology will disrupt the practice of commuting daily to and from work and will change the way people socialize. In 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic forced a drastic… Continue Reading